Lavender Infused Witch Hazel

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THIS LAVENDER/WITCH HAZEL INFUSION IS LOVELY TO HAVE ON HAND AS AN ELEMENTAL SKIN CARE PREPARATION. USE IT "AS IS" OR AS AN ADDITION TO OTHER SKIN CARE PRODUCTS.

Witch hazel, which can be found readily in your local store or purchased in specialty varieties (organic, etc.) online, works great for infusions of dried plants. It seems to take on a true quality of various plants in a short amount of time and has a variety of uses.

You can use this lavender/witch hazel infusion for:

  • Toning facial skin - witch hazel is a wonderful astringent that is perfect for combination to oily skin types.
  • Cleaning minor scrapes - the witch hazel helps to constrict capillaries and encourage swifter healing, while the lavender helps fight infections.
  • Aftershave- witch hazel and lavender both have anti-inflammatory properties good for razor burn.
  • A soothing sunburn spray - place in a spray bottle and keep it in the refrigerator for cooling relief.
  • Itch relief - dab on bug bites or other itchy areas to soothe.
  • A "mixer" - use a splash with a facial cleanser or mask to customize your products.

Some other materials that lend themselves beautifully to a witch hazel infusion are any type of mint, elderflower, lemon balm, roses, orange and lemon peel, vanilla bean or even spices like cinnamon. Get creative and let me know what you infuse!

  1. Fill a glass jar to the top with dried lavender buds.
  2. Pour the witch hazel over the buds until it completely covers them. Place a lid on the jar, label it with the preparation date and contents and place it in a cool, dark place for two weeks (or more), shaking the jar daily.
  3. Strain the infusion through a funnel lined with cheesecloth into a clean glass jar. This is the easiest way I have found for straining just about any plant preparation, after much trial and error (not to mention lost infusions on my countertop!). You can cut the infusion with a bit of distilled water, at this time, to vary the potency of the brew, should you wish.
  4. Place a lid on the jar and label with the date (I usually use the original date it was prepared). You can also store it in a pretty bottle with a cork, just because it is fancier :) This does not have to be stored in the fridge, but it will keep it fresher, longer, if you do and will have additional cooling effects. Just remember to throw it out if it starts to smell funky or grow anything weird.